popculturebrain
micdotcom:

London’s Hamlet sold 100K tickets in mere minutes because of one man: Benedict Cumberbatch

Want to know the secret to selling theater tickets? Appeal to the Tumblr crowds. That’s how a new production of Hamlet at London’s Barbican Theatre managed to attract more than 20,000 people queuing online to buy tickets last week and sell 100,000 tickets within minutes Tuesday morning. The big draw? Benedict Cumberbatch.
Cumberbatch is an Internet monolith. Thanks to his movie roles and the cultlike popularity of Sherlock, for some he is a full-blown obsession. He was tweeted about more 700,000 times in 2013, according to Vulture, and the “Cumberbitches” subreddit is always alive with activity. His dedicated fan base is likely to thank for this level of ticket sales.
Why he’s such a logical fit for the role | Follow micdotcom

micdotcom:

London’s Hamlet sold 100K tickets in mere minutes because of one man: Benedict Cumberbatch

Want to know the secret to selling theater tickets? Appeal to the Tumblr crowds. That’s how a new production of Hamlet at London’s Barbican Theatre managed to attract more than 20,000 people queuing online to buy tickets last week and sell 100,000 tickets within minutes Tuesday morning. The big draw? Benedict Cumberbatch.

Cumberbatch is an Internet monolith. Thanks to his movie roles and the cultlike popularity of Sherlock, for some he is a full-blown obsession. He was tweeted about more 700,000 times in 2013, according to Vulture, and the “Cumberbitches” subreddit is always alive with activity. His dedicated fan base is likely to thank for this level of ticket sales.

Why he’s such a logical fit for the role | Follow micdotcom

popculturebrain

My family has always been private about our time spent together. It was our way of keeping one thing that was ours, with a man we shared with an entire world. But now that’s gone, and I feel stripped bare. My last day with him was his birthday, and I will be forever grateful that my brothers and I got to spend that time alone with him, sharing gifts and laughter. He was always warm, even in his darkest moments. While I’ll never, ever understand how he could be loved so deeply and not find it in his heart to stay, there’s minor comfort in knowing our grief and loss, in some small way, is shared with millions. It doesn’t help the pain, but at least it’s a burden countless others now know we carry, and so many have offered to help lighten the load. Thank you for that.

To those he touched who are sending kind words, know that one of his favorite things in the world was to make you all laugh. As for those who are sending negativity, know that some small, giggling part of him is sending a flock of pigeons to your house to poop on your car. Right after you’ve had it washed. After all, he loved to laugh too…

Dad was, is and always will be one of the kindest, most generous, gentlest souls I’ve ever known, and while there are few things I know for certain right now, one of them is that not just my world, but the entire world is forever a little darker, less colorful and less full of laughter in his absence. We’ll just have to work twice as hard to fill it back up again.

My only statement. My brothers’ are also online. Thank you for all your kindness, and goodbye for awhile guys. xo (via zeldawilliams)
mkmohair

abjectadmirer:

Watermarked he might be, but as Cambridge catches go, I wouldn’t chuck this tasty academic back into the river.  Even prepared to forgive him for not knowing which end to punt from (not that I’m in any way biased ;o)

On Ends (the punting low-down from Oxford Daily Info)

You may have heard quite a lot about which is the correct “end” to punt from, which tends to be closely accompanied by “Of course, Cambridge do it from the wrong end”. This curious statement would seem to suggest that Cambridge punt from the front; an impossible situation, since you can’t use the pole to steer, resulting in slalom-style zigzagging from one side of the river to the other. In fact, Cambridge punts have a different (and, obviously, wrong) design to Oxford ones - where we have a gently sloping prow, ideal as a punting platform, they have a sharply vertical one. Cambridge punters are forced to stand on the high platform, whereas Oxford punters have the choice of either.

Hmm. On reflection, though, a “sharply vertical” prow can’t be all bad.

In Love Song (1985), Michael Kitchen plays William Hatchard, a self-regarding, academically conceited young man who makes a speculative play one day for a nice bit of skirt he sees crossing the college quad, and gets more than he bargains for.  The skirt turns out to be his tutorial partner, Philippa Jameson (Diana Hardcastle) and Hatchard finds, to his immense shock, that he has met his intellectual match (not to mention his eventual life-partner). The film is based on a short Jeffrey Archer story, but we won’t hold that against it.  

Mr Kitchen and Ms Hardcastle carry the bulk of the screen time, but they defer, in billing, to veterans Maurice Denham and Constance Cummings, who play their older selves.  From a Kitchen perspective, the production is notable for a) his well-observed rendition of Maurice Denham’s mannerisms and b) the volume of lard applied to keep his hair down.

wolseley37

wolseley37:

vagabondtrousers:

Cleaning out my Gifs folder. These were just too beautiful not to post. Apologies if I have previously posted any of them, but I was pretty sure none of you would mind ;O)

tayryn said: I like his eyes.

Oh yes, my dear. Those eyes can make me forget my own name…

tayryn said: *giggles* 

La Dench’s eyes have the same effect on me. :)

He’s got a cute little smile as well.

Dame Judi has gorgeous eyes; the color and shape, the mischief in them ;O) She’s precious.

Don’t even get me started on Michael Kitchen’s smile…

I’m quite sure the gifs of him at the computer monitor represent how pleased and gently amused he’d be to stumble upon our Tumblr fandom. Not. Oh well, it’s his fault for being so darn attractive. And a damn fine actor.

archiemcphee

archiemcphee:

Summer is now in full swing which means it’s Tanbo season in Japan. Last year we shared some amazing examples of Tanbo art (田んぼアート) or “rice paddy art”, created by Japanese farmers (aided by lots of volunteers) who work by hand to plant different strains of rice in order to transform their rice paddies into colossal living canvases. No artificial coloring methods are used to create these awesome scenes. Each color is simply a different type of rice.

"While planting, different areas of the rice paddy are roped off, so people know which type of rice to put where—kind of like painting by numbers.

Rice is planted in the spring, and then harvested in the fall. When it gets close to harvest, the color changes to a beautiful hue called “koganeiro” (黄金色), which is often translated as “golden” or “honey-colored”. This means the art changes as the seasons change.”

The rice paddies pictured at the top of this post depict a celestial maiden from the Japanese legend of Hagoromo beside Mount Fuji, which was recently recognized by UNESCO as a World Heritage Site.

Visit Kotaku for additional images.